Example 1

Assessment, Data Collection & School Improvement

ACCEPTABLE ACCOMMODATIONS OR MODIFICATIONS FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS

A. Setting Accommodations

1. Administering the assessment:

a. individually in a separate room
b. in a small group in a separate room
c. in the resource room
d. in a special education classroom
e. using carrels
f. at home or in a hospital (this will depend on the nature of the assessment task)

2. Seating the student in the front of the room near the examiner or proctor

3. Seating the student facing the examiner or proctor

4. Providing special lighting

5. Providing special furniture (e.g., desks, trays, carrels)

 

B . Scheduling Accommodations

1. Adding time as needed

2. Providing frequent breaks

3. Terminating a section of the test when a student has indicated that he/she has completed all the items he/she can. The test administrator must ensure that the student has attempted all items in a section since items are not ordered by difficulty. When this accommodation is used, the test must be administered in a small group or individually to avoid distraction.

 

C. Test Materials Modifications

I. Administering the large‑print version of test materials

(must grid large print bubble under Special Form on the front page of student's regular test booklet)

2. Administering the Braille version of test material

(must grid Braille bubble under Special Form on the front page of student's regular test booklet)

 

D. Test Procedure Modifications

1. Administration modifications

  • Reading directions out loud
  • Reading test questions aloud (you may not read aloud or sign the reading passages in Language Arts Literacy - you may read the reading questions)
  • Providing and ensuring that amplification (hearing aid and/or FM system) is in working order
  • Using a sign language or cued speech interpreter for administration of directions or questions but not reading passages
  • Masking a portion of the test booklet to eliminate visual distracters or providing reading windows
  • Repeating, clarifying, or rewording directions
  • Providing written directions on a separate sheet or transparency
  • Using an examiner who is familiar with the student
  • Using an examiner who can communicate fluently in sign language (American Sign Language or a form of Manually Coded English)
  • Providing manipulatives for math items
  • Using graph paper for math section
  • Using a Braille ruler and talking calculator
  • Using tactile or visual cues for deaf or hard‑of‑hearing students to indicate time to begin, time remaining, and time to end a particular part of the test

2. Response modifications

  • having an examiner record the student's identifying information on the test booklet
  • dictating oral responses to a scribe (person who writes from dictation) --student must indicate all punctuation and must spell all key words
  • using a Braille writer to record responses
  • signing responses to sign language interpreter (student must indicate all punctuation and must spell all key words)
  • recording responses on a word processor
  • using large‑face calculators
  • using talking calculators
  • providing an Augmentative Communication device
  • using a larger diameter or modified special grip #2 pencil
  • masking portions of the test booklet to eliminate visual distracters
  • marking answers in the test booklet (an examiner would transfer the answers to an answer folder ‑ not applicable for NJ ASK)

 

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

Ensure that:

  • any medication has been appropriately adjusted so it will not interfere with the student's functioning.
  • eyeglasses are used, if needed.
  • hearing aids, FM systems, Augmentative Communication devices, word processors, or other equipment are functioning properly.
  • source and strength of light are appropriate.
  • all students can clearly see and hear the examiner.
  • all deaf or hard‑of‑hearing students who communicate aurally/orally are watching the examiner when instructions are given.
  • Responses to open‑ended questions and writing tasks which are written or typed on separate sheets of paper for students eligible for this accommodation are placed in the orange Special Accommodations envelope provided. This envelope must be placed directly on top of the first Header Sheet for used test booklets. Each of these pages must include at the top of the page: the student's name, test booklet number, birth date, district name and code, school name and code, the content area, the test day (Day I or Day 2), and the item number for each response. If these procedures are not followed, the student's responses cannot be linked to their responses on the other sections of the test and they will receive incomplete scores. Copies of these pages should be retained on file by the school district until scores are received.

 

 

For large - print test booklets:

A. Students using the large‑print test booklets:

      • must mark their answers in the large‑print test booklets.
      • may be instructed to skip some questions. The spaces for these questions must be left blank on the student's test booklet.

B. For the large - print version:

  • All identifying information requested on the cover page of the large‑print test booklet must be completed (i.e., county, district, school, student name, and regular test booklet security number).
  • The cover page of a regular‑print test booklet must be gridded with all student identifying information, all appropriate "School Use Only" codes, and the (D SF (Special Form) bubble. Examiners must transcribe all responses from the large‑print version to the regular‑print version of the test booklet.
  • Both the regular‑print test booklet and the large‑print test booklet should be placed together immediately under the appropriate grade/subject Header Sheet for used test booklets.

 

C. For dictations and responses recorded on separate sheets:

  • Students who dictate responses on open‑ended items and writing tasks must indicate all punctuation and must spell all key words.
  • Responses to open‑ended questions and writing tasks recorded on separate sheets must be placed in the orange Special Accommodations envelope provided. Each of these pages must include at the top of each page: the student's name, test booklet number, birth date, district and school names and codes, the content area, the test day (Day I or Day 2), and the item number for each response.
  • The district test coordinator must retain a duplicate of all open‑ended responses and writing tasks until scores are reported to and reviewed by district staff.

 

For Braille test booklets :

a. Students using the Braille test booklets:

  • will dictate their answers to the examiner or use a device that produces Braille.
  • may be instructed to skip some questions. The spaces for these questions must be left blank on the student test booklet (be sure to grid in all the identifying information on the cover of the regular‑print test booklet).
  • should be instructed to bring a Braille ruler and a talking calculator to the test session.

 

b. Test booklets based on the Braille version:

  • must be sent to PEM along with the test booklets from students who took the regular print version of the test. Examiners must transcribe the responses into a regular‑print test booklet. Also, on the front of the regular‑print test booklet, fill in the E) bubble, which indicates that a Braille test book was transcribed.
  • both the Braille test booklet and the regular‑print test booklet must be placed directly under the appropriate grade/subject Header Sheet with all other used test booklets beneath them.

c. For dictations and responses recorded in Braille:

  • Students who dictate responses for the open‑ended questions and writing tasks must indicate all punctuation and must spell all key words.
  • Responses to the writing task and open‑ended questions recorded in Braille:
  • must be transcribed into the regular‑print test booklet. The student's own Brailled work must be returned to PEM at the time the test booklet is returned.
  • must be placed in the orange Special Accommodations envelope provided. Each of the pages must include at the top of each page: the student's name, test booklet number, birth date, district and school names and codes, the content area, the test day (Day 1 or Day 2), and the item number for each response.
  • The district test coordinator must retain a duplicate of all Brailled open‑ended responses and writing tasks until scores are reported to and reviewed by district staff.

 

For students who communicate using sign language:

  • An interpreter will be needed to interpret oral directions and test questions (you may not interpret the reading passages in the Language Arts Literacy section of the test). The interpreter should be able to communicate in the mode used by the student, American Sign Language or a form of Manually Coded English, depending upon the student's communication system. The interpreter should be instructed to interpret so as not to give the answer to the student through the use of a particular sign or finger spelling.
  • Students using American Sign Language for open‑ended and writing task responses will sign the responses to the interpreter who will interpret them into spoken English and a scribe who will record the responses in the test booklet.
  • Students using Signed English or cued speech will sign/cue to the interpreter who will transliterate (word for word) into spoken English and a scribe will record the responses.
  • Contact @ State: Roberta Wohle - (609)292-0147 in the Office of Special Education programs.

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT STUDENTS

NCLB prohibits exemptions from testing based on LEP status. However, limited English proficient (LEP) students may be tested with one or more accommodations in the test administration procedures. Accommodations that are permitted include the following:

  • Additional time up to 150% of the administration times indicated
  • Translation of the test directions only into the student's native language (translations of passages, items, prompts, and tasks are NOT permitted)
  • Use of a bilingual dictionary

Students who are receiving translated test directions need to be tested in a location separate from students tested with directions read in English only.

If bilingual dictionaries are used, they may be provided by either the student or the school. Ideally, students should be using the same dictionaries they use as part of their instructional program. The dictionaries should be checked before testing begins to be sure that no papers or additional reference information (such as loose sheets, other school work, etc.) is inside them.